The Glass Bead Game: Magister Ludi

Glasperlenspiel

 


from Wikipedia

The game

The Glass Bead Game is “a kind of synthesis of human learning”[9] in which themes, such as a musical phrase or a philosophical thought, are stated. As the Game progresses, associations between the themes become deeper and more varied.[9] Although the Glass Bead Game is described lucidly, the rules and mechanics are not explained in detail.[10]


Continue reading “The Glass Bead Game: Magister Ludi”

Long/Short: Different Encodings for Memory Recall


Something about the experiment in the following article makes me think about the access and recall of memories. How is it that when I attempt to recall something, at first I am presented with an absence? Then, as images of that memory start forming in the present, how does that previous absence inform my capacity to determine whether or not the recalled memory is accurate?  The process by which we recognize a memory as actually having-been is not as trivial as it seems, I think.

Continue reading “Long/Short: Different Encodings for Memory Recall”

Phi Movement

 

Click to open animation in new tab.

 

A more elegant experiment to demonstrate the Phi phenomenon or effect originally made use of two parallel line segments with a gap between them. By displaying them in alternation, there is a rate at which we start to perceive the two separate segments as a single line moving back and forth, however that remains unclear (see: wikipedia talk-page reference). We are perhaps more familiar with the effect as the spinning pinwheel, wait cursor, or chaser-lights lining the perimeter of theatre marquees.

What is peculiar about the phenomenon is not only that it works in creating the illusion of motion between recognizably static elements. Continue reading “Phi Movement”

Synchronous Sortilege

Coincidental Connections

In the spirit of things non-linear, an interesting coincidence just occurred. Attempting to re-enable comments, in light of the previous post, I visited my site from the computer of a friend already logged-in to WP. Given how comments were not readily working from that account, I offhandedly searched for “future release temporality” from their reader. The top result was:

— Source: https:// environmentalcritique. files.wordpress.com/ 2016/07/

Continue reading “Synchronous Sortilege”

Fireflies like Stepping-Stones

Fireflies Across the Border

Intermittently flashing, they carve free-flowing paths of light through dark time. Each spark signals an evanescent route of moving  steps run-through by matching rhythms calling forth immanent reproduction. Leaving no trace except immediate direction to those already there, they are semaphores to an alternate world, passages from the future of a traveling autonomy.
 


 

The metaphor is derivative, a reproduction from a more articulate source. I cannot find the corresponding reference in the text I thought it was from.

Model Roundup

An Ongoing List of Temporal Architectures

Temporal Consciousness

Three Models of Temporal Consciousness(Dainton)

(Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)

In our ordinary experience, over brief intervals, we seem to be directly aware of temporally extended phenomena such as change, persistence and succession.

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When we see a friend waving goodbye, do we infer that their arm is moving, on the basis of having observed a motionless arm occupying a sequence of adjacent spatial location? We do make such inferences of this kind: if I see that my neighbour’s dustbin is in the middle of the road rather than its usual position on the pavement, I (rightly) infer that it has been moved. But the case in question is not at all like this: what we see is simply an arm in motion. (Is it for nothing that cinema is often called ‘the moving image’?) The same applies in other sensory modalities. When listening to a melody, we hear each note giving way to its successor; when we hear a sustained violin tone, we hear the tone continuing on, from moment to moment. If temporally extended occurrences such as these can feature in our immediate experience, it is natural to conclude that our awareness must be capable of embracing a temporal interval.

While this may seem obvious, it can also seem problematic. We can remember the past and anticipate the future, but we are only directly aware of what is present – or so it is natural to say and suppose. But the present, strictly speaking, is momentary. So if our awareness is confined to the present, our awareness must itself lack temporal depth. Hence we are led swiftly to the conclusion that our direct awareness cannot possibly encompass phenomena possessing temporal extension. We are thus confronted with a conundrum: it seems our awareness must extend over time, but it seems it can’t.

In grappling with this ‘paradox of temporal awareness’ as it is sometimes called, different philosophers have proposed quite different accounts (or models) of the structure of temporal consciousness. Simplifying somewhat, the most commonly favoured options fall into three main categories:

Cinematic Model: our immediate awareness lacks any (or any significant) temporal extension, and the same applies to the contents of which we are directly aware – they are akin to static, motion-free ‘snapshots’ or ‘stills’. Our streams of consciousness are composed of continuous successions of these momentary states of consciousness. In this respect they are analogous to movies, which (as displayed) consist of rapid sequences of still images.

Retentional Model: our experiencing of change and succession occurs within episodes of consciousness which themselves lack temporal extension, but whose contents present (or represent) temporally extended intervals and phenomena. These episodes thus have a complex structure, comprising momentary phases of immediate experience, along with representations (or retentions) of the recent past. Our streams of consciousness are composed of successions of these momentary states.

Extensional Model: our episodes of experiencing are themselves temporally extended, and are thus able to incorporate change and persistence in a quite straightforward way. Our streams of consciousness are composed of successions of these extended ‘chunks’ of experience.

These labels are not standard – in this field there is little by way of terminological uniformity – but they are as apt as any. All three models are depicted in Figure 1 below. In each of the diagrams the horizontal line represents ordinary clock-time. Although the Retentional and Cinematic models both trade in momentary (or very brief) states of consciousness – in the diagrams such states are represented by thin vertical lines – these states are construed very differently. In the Cinematic case the momentary contents seem momentary, and are static (they contain no discernible motion or change); in the Retentional case the contents appear to possess a brief temporal depth, containing as they do experienced change and succession – hence the backward pointing arrows, intended to signify the way in which the recent past is supposedly ‘retained’ in present consciousness.

 

Source: Temporal Consciousness (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)


The Burning Fuse Model of Unbecoming in Time.  (Norton)

In the burning fuse model of unbecoming in time, the future is real and the past is unreal. It is used to motivate the idea that there is something unbecoming in the present literature on the metaphysics of time: its focus is merely the assigning of a label “real.”
John D. Norton 

Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs)

The Burning Fuse model reminded me of how rockets using solid fuel always burn all propellant to exhaustion. Once started, the reaction cannot be stopped by anything other than the absence of fuel. There is no “off” switch.  

 

 


Dainton, Barry. “(Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) .” Temporal Consciousness. N.p., 21 Dec. 2016. Web. 17 Mar. 2017. <https://plato.stanford.edu/archives/win2016/entries/consciousness-temporal/>.
Norton, John D. “Burning Fuse.” Unbecoming. N.p., 16 Apr. 2013. Web. 19 Feb. 2017. <http://www.pitt.edu/~jdnorton/Goodies/unbecoming/unbecoming.html>.

Angles of Incidence

  • The Glass Bead Game: Magister Ludi

    Glasperlenspiel   from Wikipedia The game The Glass Bead Game is “a kind of synthesis of human learning”[9] in which themes, such as a musical phrase or a philosophical thought, are stated. As the Game progresses, associations between the themes become deeper and more varied.[9] Although the Glass Bead Game is described lucidly, the rules and mechanics […]

  • ARM to RAM: Swarm Manipulation

    Researching memory recall, I found something about the following articles made me think I should probably read them at some point. They seem to be about mapping and manipulating neural activation patterns in primates, and also creating systems to cooperatively control robotic arms, swarms, and memory recall. Thinking backward, we might not be too far from a point […]

  • Long/Short: Different Encodings for Memory Recall

    What really happens when we make and store memories has been unravelled in a discovery that surprised even the scientists who made it. The US and Japanese team found that the brain “doubles up” by simultaneously making two memories of events.

  • Phi Movement

        A more elegant experiment to demonstrate the Phi phenomenon or effect originally made use of two parallel line segments with a gap between them. By displaying them in alternation, there is a rate at which we start to perceive the two separate segments as a single line moving back and forth, however that […]

  • Synchronous Sortilege

    Coincidental Connections In the spirit of things non-linear, an interesting coincidence just occurred. Attempting to re-enable comments, in light of the previous post, I visited my site from the computer of a friend already logged-in to WP. Given how comments were not readily working from that account, I offhandedly searched for “future release temporality” from their […]

  • Fireflies like Stepping-Stones

    Fireflies Across the Border Intermittently flashing, they carve free-flowing paths of light through dark time. Each spark signals an evanescent route of moving  steps run-through by matching rhythms calling forth immanent reproduction. Leaving no trace except immediate direction to those already there, they are semaphores to an alternate world, passages from the future of a traveling autonomy.   […]

  • Angles of Incidence

    Different approaches to understanding the question: Calculus – differentiation / integration- time scales Continuity / Discreteness Unity / Difference – different difference Identity / || Now / Transmigration Solve / Coagulate – E Pluribus Unum – Meaning / Value Nothing / Something Ontological / Ontic Self / Other False dichotomy based on misuse of principle […]


Different approaches to understanding the question:
Calculus - differentiation / integration- time scales
Continuity / Discreteness

Unity / Difference - different difference
Identity / ||
Now / Transmigration
Solve / Coagulate - E Pluribus Unum - Meaning / Value

Nothing / Something
Ontological / Ontic

Self / Other
False dichotomy based on misuse of principle of recognition

CRX § 2.0 – Preliminary Remarks

The Intention

This  section follows the development of how to think (about) time in a way that corresponds with the manner in which it is experienced.  In addition to separate entries that post in other categories, according to relevance, the writing specifically on Conversion, Recursion and Excursion is a piece that I have been and will be working on for some time. The focal point is to articulate a way of understanding time phenomenologically. To start rendering the interrelated structure of present, past, and future, I currently use the terms Conversion, Recursion, and Excursion (C.R.X.)[1]  Continue reading “CRX § 2.0 – Preliminary Remarks”